Posts tagged: t2i

VizTools HandiZoom ENG Style for DSLR

VizTools HandiZoom ENG Style for DSLR

FCP X: Native vs. Optimize vs. Proxy Media

FCP X: Native vs. Optimize vs. Proxy Media

Anamorphic lens to be announced @ NAB 2012

Anamorphic lens to be announced @ NAB 2012


Professional USB Controller for Canon HDSLR coming soon
Fri/Nov/2011 Filed in: 5D | 7D | 60D | T2I | T3I | USB | REMOTE | RECORD
This new device is designed for professional use on rig supports but it can also be used as a traditional remote control.It has some unique specifications and features:

Professional USB Controller for Canon HDSLR coming soon

This new device is designed for professional use on rig supports but it can also be used as a traditional remote control.
It has some unique specifications and features:

Lighting Basics: Going With What is Available

The exciting thing about the Arri Alexa, F-3 and the new wave of DSLR’s is their high ISO range to minimum noise ratio. This has opened up a whole new way to light as a cinematographer. 
Here are the units that lit the Plaza:
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"The Ninja" HDMI Recorder with style.

At first I thought the ninja was vapor wear. I first read about the ninja back in June of 2010 and follows it’s progress up to today. An HDMI disc recorder with a a touch screen and it a monitor. Loins and tigers and bears oh my.

10bit Uncompressed to Apple ProRes Field Recorder, Monitor and Playback Device $995 USD, €795 Ex.VAT £695 Ex.VAT Built-in monitor Capture from any clean, valid, HDMI source Capture in real-time to visually-lossless Apple ProRes LONG record times Infinite storage capability Low power consumption Atomos Continuous Power twin “looping’ battery system Software-upgradable hardware for maximum flexibility Touchscreen for simple, easy-to-use and infinitely-upgradable user interface Infinite storage capability Atomos Ninja demonstration from UrbanFox.TV on Vimeo.

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So the rumors were true! Handyfilmtools to become edelkrone

Handyfilmtools is changing their name to edelkrone and in this video, they show a wide range of new products and video rigs they’ll be showing off at NAB. There has been some discussion on the planet5D forums about the Handy Base.X rigs if you happened to see that.

It appears this new gear will be available starting in May 2011.

planet5D reader Furinox sent us this news – thanks!

Canon Updates E1 Plugin for FCP.

Canon Updates E1 Plugin for FCP.

Canon announces latest update for EOS Movie Plug-in-E1 for Final Cut Pro

Canon today announces the latest update for EOS Movie Plug-in-E1 for Final Cut Pro – the company’s custom-developed software application that provides quicker and easier editing of EOS Movie footage in Apple’s Final Cut Pro software suite.

Launching to coincide with the start of the 2011 National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) Show in Las Vegas, EOS Movie Plug-in-E1 for Final Cut Pro version 1.2 will make the importing of EOS Movie files even easier, allowing users to transfer files from any folder, without needing to mirror the folder structure on the camera itself.

The update also enables smoother importing from Canon’s EOS 7D, EOS 5D Mark II and EOS-1D Mark IV models, allowing users to import footage without requiring the THM file generated by the camera.

Originally launched in February 2010, EOS Movie Plug-in-E1 for Final Cut Pro is designed to quickly and seamlessly convert EOS Movie footage from Canon’s leading range of EOS DSLR cameras to Apple’s high-quality ProRes 422 codec. The plug-in allows users to convert footage at approximately twice the speed of Apple’s standard conversion, creating a smoother workflow for the rapidly growing number of videographers shooting HD video content on DSLR cameras.

EOS Movie Plug-in-E1 for Final Cut Pro version 1.2 will be available to download for free from 25th April 2011.

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Fixing Random Hot or Dead Pixels


Screen shot 2011-04-09 at 2.56.15 AM

I found this helpfull tip on “CheesyCam" Save it for those moments when you think it’s all gone wrong in the middle of a shoot.

Most DSLR video guys would never notice this problem, but for photographers, it’s something that happens pretty often. If you’ve been doing long exposures or dark images and have been seeing some stray / hot / or dead pixels, here’s a tip to try before sending the camera in. This has been implemented in DSLR cameras for a very very long time and is a way to remap these pixels (hide the bad ones). Is this some type of hack job? Actually, no. Many cameras will do this automatically on start up or shut down, and it’s almost impossible for any chip with millions of pixels to be 100% perfect. Here’s how you do it.

First remove any lens on the camera and place the body cap. You can actually do this with a lens, but you’re more prone to ‘light leaks’. Place the DSLR Body cap on and for safe measure, you might want to cover it again with a dark cloth, tshirt, or dark blanket. You basically want to keep any light from leaking into the camera while performing the cleaning.

Go to the Menu > Select Sensor Cleaning > Manual Clean.

2011-04-09 02.27.28

2011-04-09 02.27.42

The Mirror flips open, the camera basically should expect every pixel to be completely black, but if it’s finding some white or red ones, it should remap them. After about 30 seconds, turn the power off on the camera. Now go out and test out your long exposures or dark imaging to see if those same hot pixels still show up.

Here’s another tip. If you plan on buying or selling a DSLR, you can also perform a test against your sensor to see these stray or hot pixels. You can leave a lens on the camera, but just cover it up completely to prevent light leaks or sit in a very very dark room. Set the lens to ‘Manual Focus’, set ISO to the lowest like 100, shutter speed to say 1/60th, and aperature doesn’t really matter. We’re not doing long exposure here, because we don’t want to confuse a Dead pixel with ISO noise. Next, take a picture. The picture should come out ‘mostly’ black, but this test will show some stray red or white hot pixels (unless it’s already been remapped which is OK). If you’re shopping for that camera, and you can’t seem to get rid of those stray pixels, consider if they are so bad they would render your work useless. Again, since HD video doesn’t actually use all the pixels by the time it’s resized down, Video shooters may not notice something like this as easily.

OCHi FIlms